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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z   日本語
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Displaying 75 to 100 of 101
Sekuhara
セクハラ
Posted by: Bruce
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Sexual Harassment
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shirigaru
しりがる
Details
comes from the words ‘oshiri’ (butt) and ‘karui’ (light). When you use ‘shirigaru’, you are literally saying that the woman’s butt is light and thus she is easy to 'pick up'.
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shiruba hauzingu
シルバーハウジング
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"silver housing": an old folks' home.
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shouben
しょうべん
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"piss", "leak", urinate
Have you ever looked on the toilet flushers and wondered why they have the kanji for big and small on there? Shou comes from the small kanji. Daiben is number 2 (dai being big, obviously). One way uses less water (for number 1) and the other would be used often after a spicy curry cook-off. Comment by: Rob   
Oohhh, now I know what my friend wrote in my yearbook last year, that's funny. It said something like, "I pissed here on this page" Comment by: Yomotsuhegui   
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shouku
ショック
Posted by: Bruce
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Shock
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sugee
スゲー
Posted by: BruceRating:1.2  
Details
"Cool", great, wonderful. Hip version of "Sugoi", meaning favorably impressed, equilvalent to the American English "cool". The last sylable is sometimes extended for emphasis, "SU-GEEEE", again similar to the English, "COOOOL!"
i like sugoi better... Comment by: hihi   
I LOVE Sugoi! Comment by: Ligaya   
sugoi is better. More people use it too I thought. Screw sugee. >_ Comment by: PON PON   
'sugee' is a slang word you really get used to ~ I come across it a lot while playing jap games. It's kinda a welcome relief with all these non-japanese wannabes raping 'sugoi~' Comment by: eriberri    Rated:4/5
=_= there like almost no difference in saying "sugoi" lol woooow Comment by: miyoko-chan   
Sugge is used more by kids, it sounds kinda odd coming from anyone older than junior high age. Comment by: Ken    Rated:3/5
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sugee
スゲー
Details
"Cool", great, wonderful. Hip version of "Sugoi", meaning favorably impressed, equilvalent to the American English "cool". The last sylable is sometimes extended for emphasis, "SU-GEEEE", again similar to the English, "COOOOL!"
When my female cousin used this phrase in Japan, people giggled at her. Someone later explained that it's more of a word used by guys ^^' Comment by: Anon   
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suya suya
すやすや
Posted by: Bruce
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deep and peaceful sleep, "zzzzzzz"
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Takuru
タクる
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catch a cab
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te iu ka
ていうか
Rating:0.9  
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Used properly ‘te iu ka is a 100% correct Japanese phrase meaning, “In other words…”. For example you could say, “’te iu ka wakaretai”, meaning “In other words, you want to break up with me.” This phrase has become one of the top language peeves of people over 30 however, because of the way young people over-use it. Watch “The Coliseum” segment on Inazuma, and almost every sentence will start with this phrase, no matter whether other person has said anything or not. It’s about equivalent to the way North American teen-agers use “like” and “you know”.
Pantsu meiteru zo
to get even more slangy shorten the phrase and say it like: てかぁ、 or  つか、 Comment by: clubikimakuri   
Its not "te", its "to". te could also be considered a slang. like when someone asks, "Fish stick te nani?" Comment by: Rob   
actually, te iu ka is probably correct, it's probably a disjointing + misplacement of tte iu, which is how you quote someone. [って言う] Comment by: Kat   
と言うか (or perhaps I should say... how should I put it...) is right. Then you have って言うか and て言うか... getting shorter and more colloquial which are also used. Comment by: Trublmkr   
the correct way of saying it is to iu ka... where to is the quote marker. tte is also a quote marker, but I would not call either of those slang at all. I have never heard someone say te iu ka, and I speak fluent Japanese and live in Japan. Sometimes in a informal, "slang" situation" they will kind of blur the words together fast though... Comment by: qQshA    Rated:3/5
Maaa neee! Comment by: An observer   
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Toraburu
トラブル
Posted by: Bruce
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"Trouble", problem, usage is more like English "problem", e.g. "the nuclear powerplant had a 'trouble'".
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urusai
うるさい
Rating:0.9  
Details
Literally, "annoying" or "noisy" but when yelled brusquely it essentially means "Shut up"
but if order to be taken as "slang" the word ought to be pronounced: うぜー、 or, うざい Comment by: clubikimakuri   
This can be very ... frightening when an older Japanese lady is yelling it at your class. xD Comment by: Ashuri-san    Rated:4/5
URUSEE! you can hear moms say that to their kids all the time. Comment by: Rob   
what about "TAMARE"? Is that the same? Comment by: mammmal   
You mean, "Damare"?? Yes, that is the more rude form of saying "Shut up!". If you're like me and normally use "Urusai" to say shut up, then when you're really pissed off and want someone to REALLY shut up, you'd probably use "Damare." But that's just me. Comment by: Miki   
there is also うるせんだよ which tends to be a little more coarse Comment by: Jisatsu_no_Tenshi   
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Urusai
うるさい
Rating:2.0  
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Noisy, like "shut up you noisy twit"
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uso
うそ
Posted by: Tsubomi
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The actual word for lie is "uso" not "usou". The kanji is "嘘" and the hiragana for it is "うそ". When used in an exclamation, it may sound as if the second syllable is longer and emphasized.
sometimes, we use "usso!" うっそ.... usso majide?! Comment by: n   
ya in manga's ive read, a lot of school girls use "usso maji" xD i got that stuck in my head forever. tho i think it's a more popular phrase among females, i dont think it's weird for males to use it. Comment by: xcurior   
My Japanese friends use "uso" all the time. I think I hear guys say it more than girls, but it's used by both genders. Comment by: PoliSci   
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Uso
うそ
Details
You're kidding! It's a lie!
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usou
うそう
Posted by: BruceRating:1.6  
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"No way!", "Really?". "Usou" is actually the word for "a lie" but in informal speech is equilvalent to the American English "No way!" or "Really?" Usually used to indicate disbelief, e.g.: "No way!, that can't possibly be true!", sometimes used as a question, e.g.: "Really? Is that really true?" Since this is actually the word for lie, the word's usage is considered rude by many, particularly older people.
Sorry, please use Shift-JIS encoding to view the last message properly. Comment by: Nombiri    Rated:3/5
wrong spelling Comment by: a    Rated:1/5
it's wrong. we never use usoU Comment by: n    Rated:1/5
Yeah, I've NEVER heard "Usou" before. That just sounds like a freak Jap-crazed American trying to pronounce something in Japanese, but failing epically. Comment by: Miki   
Nimbiri is correct. 'Usou' is supposed to be spelled 'uso.' However I understand why the word could get lost in translation between verbal diction to romanji. When the word is exaggerated or emphasized the 'o' at the end is pronounced lengthy. Giving the 'uso(oooo)' effect, where the additional o's give the lengthy effect. Regardless, the meaning of the word in that particular context is correct. Comment by: Maiki    Rated:3/5
u guys r dumb, quit using jap as a shorthand its the only racist word in websters dictionary that acceptable have some pride. u dont see n**ger as a shorthand Comment by: racist killer   
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Usou
うそう
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거짓말! 거짓말마! 설마!
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uzai
うざい
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pain in ass
this word is a shortened form of Urusai Comment by: Nashenas   
you can make it more slangy and say Uze ウゼー! Comment by: cafekko   
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wan wan
わんわん
Posted by: Bruce
Details
Bark of a dog, "bow-wow". Children sometimes call dogs "Wan-Wan".
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yabeeyo/yabee
やべーよ・やべー
Rating:0.7  
Details
Dangerous.
Yabe- is actually a shortened form of yabai. Yabai/yabe can be used for moments of danger (oh shit moments) or when something is really unbelieveable (beyond sugoi/suge), but is true or did occur. Comment by: Masa    Rated:2/5
I use this all the time (in the right context, of course, haha not k.y.), but I didn't know that it could be used as anything but having a bad connotation, like those good old "oh shit" moments. Comment by: Miki   
I often hear it used for good things as slang. Good looking girl, or cheap all you can drink, situations that are too good. Comment by: めい3   
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yada
やだ
Posted by: BruceRating:0.8  
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"No way", "Yuk", "That's gross", "Enough already". Often said by a person that doesn't want to do something, e.g. by a child being forced to eat their vegetables.
Host brother says this often Comment by: Willy    Rated:4/5
I don't think this is said by men. I think it's more of a young child (girl or boy) or women. Comment by: kagakun    Rated:4/5
i start off learnin japanese from their porno, one of the word they use the most on the bed lol. Comment by: martin   
@ kagakun - depends upon the man & his level of innocence I guess. Personally I've heard it from younger to older, including men.. (granted, they weren't really MANLY men, but yeh..) Comment by: eriberri   
its いやだ。And you're right, its usually used by children and girls, but I have heard older guys say it too. Comment by: Rob   
Well this probably shouldn't go under "Iyada," but "Iya" is kind of slang, I guess. Like when you say "well no, it's rather this way...." while talking to someone, you would use "Iya." I think it's a branch off of "Iiye," not "Iyada." I don't know lol, the Japanese I know/learn is from what I hear around me, when I go to Japan/ talk to my mum. Comment by: Miki   
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yappa
やっぱ
Posted by: BruceRating:0.7  
Details
"Of course", "I know", "Yeah, that's right". Shortened slang version of "yappari" and "yahari", usually used to begin a response to a question (e.g. a TV interview). Sometimes used as a sentence connector, meaning: "Of course", "as I thought", "after all is said and done".
Oh baby wait and see, YAPPA itai no wa Iya, dakedo, Risuku ga aru kara koso tatakau hodo ni tsuyoku naru no sa.
I wonder if thats where the english word , yep, comes from? Comment by: O.J. #1   
most likely they stole it from us Comment by: rphinks   
it should be YABBA not YAPPA.. =) Comment by: raenxia    Rated:5/5
"Yappa pe, yappa pe, ii shan ten" - Ranma Nibun no Ichi (Sugoi ne?) Comment by: Kimijima Rei <3   
it's a derivative of 'yahari', meaning apparently, or obviously. Comment by: jap   
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yariman
やりまん
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‘Yariman’ and ‘shirigaru’ are both ways of saying a girl is easy, but yariman is extremely offensive (and gets bleeped out). It’s like calling someone a slut, while ‘shirigaru’, while not exactly polite, is somewhat less rude. ‘Shirigaru’ seems to be slipping out of modern usage but you still hear it on occasion. ‘Yariman’ comes from ‘yari’ (a hotshot or a go-getter) and ‘man’, meaning vagina. [From http://www.japan-zine.com/humor.htm] STUFF THEY DON’T TEACH YOU IN JAPANESE SCHOOL - WORDS I LEARNED FROM LONDON BOOTS
Also, YELLOWCAB will get you the madcow look..Means the same, if not worse than YARIMAN. Katagana is the way you will write this out.. Comment by: kc   
I'm pretty sure YARIMAN came from: YARU(遣る) and MAN(万)。If it didn't I'm still going to tell people that 'She did ten thousand'. It's more fun! Comment by: Amber   
u mean kataKANA Comment by: umm   
actually yari is derived from yaru or yarimasu which means to preform or the act of sex. and the man part is correct hehe Comment by: saikou   
man part is actually from manko...see another post... manwhore...or a guy who sleeps with lots of women is a yarichin... chinchin means dick manko means...yeah...opposite. Comment by: miki   
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yaru
やる
Rating:1.0  
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to do. also used in "to do it" (sex). example: today i plan to lay her for the first time.
hell ya Comment by: jeseman_04   
it's also used to say someone is good at something, for instance "yaru ne" for someone who can play poker really well, etc. and most of the time, yaru is just "to do". people who don't know japanese really well will have a hard time making it come across as "to do sex" lol. Comment by: xcurior   
"Yaru" means "to do" but it can also mean, "to give to an inferior." So, for example, you could say, "Inu ni tabemono wo yarimashita." Which just means, "I gave food to the dog." Comment by: BOO    Rated:3/5
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yobo yobo
よぼよぼ
Posted by: Bruce
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weak from old age
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