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Displaying 0 to 11 of 11
Feller
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Rating:3.0  
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East Coast equivalant (PEI & NFLD) to saying Fella or Fellow
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Fill you boots
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Do whatever you want. "Go ahead, fill your boots"
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fin, sawbuck
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slang for five and ten dollars
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Flask
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The Newfoundleand term for a 13 oz bottle of alcohol (see also mickey, twenty-sixer, forty-pounder, Eighty-ouncer)
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FORTY POUNDER
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A Forty ounce bottle of liquor
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four by four
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four sugars and four creams
4×4 ("four by four") is a four-wheeled vehicle with a drivetrain that allows all four wheels to receive torque from the engine simultaneously. Didn't know anyone ordered their coffee this way... Comment by: Leamop   
Sounds like someone is trying to create a "Canadianism." Comment by: Gian   
Heard this for the first time at a Timmy's. The guy got his coffee as ordered, no questions asked. The Timmy's girl knew exactly what he was asking for. Comment by: Wayne   
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Francophone
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Rating:0.8  
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A Canadian with French as their first language
Francophone is not just for a Canadian for whom French is a first langauge but for anyone who is a native speaker. Comment by: Benjamin Lavallee    Rated:2/5
What? No, absolutely not! Francophone is for language spoken. Not origins. Check with your PQ rep, He/she will tell you the same. Let me guess, you father and grand-father used to be PQ/FLQ right! Comment by: Martin    Rated:1/5
Excusez moi, mais JE PARLE LA LANGUE! Qu'est-ce que tu as toi? Je suis francophone, je suis quelqu'un qui parle franais! Je sais pas ce que tu assai a faire la! Comment by: Lavallee   
A francophone can also mean someone whose ancestory is French but they don't necessarly speak the language themselves. Compare with Francophile (an anglophone or allophone who loves/ speaks French fairly well) Comment by: Lily   
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Freshie
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Powdered drink mix (like Koolaid). Named after the drink mix from the 70s with the Toucan on the label.
"freshie" is also used to mean a freshman in college or highschool. ex "look at that freshie" or "look at that fresh meat". -saskatchewan Comment by: Brittney   
Brittney's comment isn't accurate for Alberta...I didn't know what a "freshman" was until I went to America. We don't use those terms. Comment by: Shane   
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Fry Trucks
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Food truck. Ontario version of the "Roach Coach"
Fly Trucks is actually more accurate. Comment by: The Chef   
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Fuck the dog
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to literally do nothing. in the states it might be 'dick around' alternatively "screw the pooch". "Jim really fucked the dog today at work" "I'm just gonna fuck the dog today"
No, \"screw the pooch\" means to make a huge mistake, which obviously isn\'t the same as \"Dicking around\" or, presumable, \"f*ck the Dog.\" Comment by: A Yank   
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fuddle-duddle
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former Prime Ministers Trudeau's answer when asked what he said by the speaker of the house, he really said fucking bullshit, thus it has that meaning. A euphemistic substitution for "fuck" or "fuck off". Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau caused a minor scandal when opposition MPs claimed he had mouthed the words "Fuck off" to them in the House of Commons in February 1971. Pressed by journalists, Trudeau later unconvincingly stated he may have said (or mouthed) "fuddle duddle or something like that." Trudeau likely got the word "fuddle duddle" from the official Hansard transcript of his words for that parliamentary session. The Hansard reporter couldn't make out (or chose not to record verbatim) what Trudeau had mouthed, and chose to write down the now-infamous phrase instead. The phrase then took on a humorous connotation for Canadians.
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